Seminole Heights Community Gardens


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Our compost is active

Beautiful mosaic sign by member Carolyn Adler

Curious about compost? Community members bring us kitchen scraps and deposit them in the white buckets just outside our fence. We have a 3 bin compost system which we dig out at least once a week and then layer in the scraps & coffee grounds together with dry leaves. Do you want to help us compost? We always welcome more!
Yes:
-veggie scraps, fruit peels, almost everything plant-based (see exceptions below)
-coffee grounds & tea bags
-egg shells
No:
-meat or dairy
-citrus
-hard nut shells, avocado pits (these take too long to break down)
We use this dirt to plant everything in our garden which adds nutrients back in to the soil.
Join us Saturday mornings if you want to come by and see how it works, or we welcome scraps in the buckets near our sign (6114 River Terrace) at your convenience.
Thank you for helping us grow!

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Join us for Brunch in the Garden

It’s time to put down our tools and enjoy our new space.

Please join us 10am – 12pm on Saturday February 17th at 6114 River Terrace.  Bring a dish to share, and BYOP – bring your own plate, utensils and glass or water bottle. In the effort to be more sustainable we ask that everyone take out of the garden what they bring in, so come prepared!

See you at brunch next weekend!

 


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Welcome (back) USF Student Volunteers!

Once again, the Seminole Heights Community Garden will benefit from a USF Morning of Service event. We’re expecting up to ten student volunteers to visit us this Saturday morning, arriving at 9:15-9:30 am and leaving 12:15-12:30 pm. That’s three hours of people power, and we need to show our appreciation with lots of members on hand to greet and guide them. Can you help?

 


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Some thoughts on starting a garden from one of our own…

Lyrical Garden Libby

I love starting a garden. Cardboard is laid on the grass, and bark spread upon it.
A field of useless grass, which needs mowing if not also chemicals to maintain, is soon transformed into an attractive natural looking area, at the same time as it is creating a rich soil out of the decomposing bark and cardboard. The cardboard is recycled from large containers, and the bark is given free by tree companies who are happy to offload it rather than take it to the dump.

Next come autumn leaves, and manure from vegetarian animals, spread on the areas where soil for plants is to be created.

I love moving the mulch and feeling the sun and breeze on my working muscles. This body loves physical labour. It feels exultant when perspiration arises, anticipating the pleasure of bathing later.

I dream of a time when more and more of those grassy lawns we see, are reduced with areas of mulched ground, pleasant to see, and suggesting wild nature, which recycles and does not create waste. They will be decomposting – breaking down ready for creating a garden; top up the mulch with more free mulch as needed. One day we will need to feed ourselves and not rely on food that is shipped in. This is how to create local resilience –

I can’t wait to harvest our own organic crops. How good they taste.

Elizabeth E Mitchell
Silk Painting and Studio Experiences.
http://www.elizabethmitchellstudio.com